Diabetes

Diabetes

According to the Office of Minority Health, Natives are almost three times more likely than non-Hispanic white adults to be diagnosed with diabetes. In 2018, Natives were 2.3 times more likely to die from diabetes than non-Hispanic whites. Lastly, in 2017, Natives were twice as likely to be diagnosed with end-stage renal disease than non-Hispanic whites. 

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) health condition that impacts how your body uses food. More specifically how your body turns food into energy. 

Types of Diabetes

The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant)

  • Type 1 diabetes: thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) that stops your body from making insulin 
  • Type 2 diabetes: your body doesn't use insulin well and can't keep blood sugar at normal levels 
  • Gestational diabetes: only develops in pregnant women who have never had diabetes

Prediabetes 

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 88 million adults have prediabetes. That is more than 1 in 3 people. Even more concerning is that more than 84% of them do not know they have it. A person with prediabetes has blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. 

Diabetes Stats 

  • Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States 
  • Over the last 20 years, the number of persons diagnosed with diabetes has more than doubled 
  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult blindness

Risk Factors 

There are several factors that increase your risk of developing diabetes. Some of these factors are: 

  • Obesity and overweight 
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure) 
  • High cholesterol 
  • Cigarette smoking 

Information gathered from the CDC

We support our relatives with diabetes.

 

Great Plains Good Health and Wellness

Great Plains Good Health and Wellness

GPTLHB’s Great Plains Good Health and Wellness (GPGHW) program use evidence-informed, culturally rooted health promotion and disease prevention initiatives to help Great Plains area tribes combat obesity, commercial tobacco use, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

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Last modified on: Wednesday, July 20th, 2022 @ 12:49 pm

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