Vaccines and Immunization

Prevention is always better than treatment. To prevent severe illness and even death, we encourage all our relatives to stay updated with their vaccinations. All vaccines are safe and effective. Below are links to resources about all the vaccinations you need from birth until becoming an elder. We want you to have access to the best information out there, empowering you to make informed decisions about your health.

Vaccines for Children

Getting your children vaccinated on time can give your child immunity before exposure to potentially life-threatening diseases. You should always talk with your child's doctor if you have questions or concerns about the vaccines your child needs. With so much information available today, you need to know the facts before making potentially life-altering health decisions. Vaccines prevent dangerous and even deadly diseases. Visit the links below to learn more about what vaccines your children need.

Children ages birth to 15-months should get the following vaccines to protect against common high-risk diseases: 

  • DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, acellular Pertussis)
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella)
  • Varicella (chickenpox) – can be combined with MMR vaccine; the combined vaccine is called MMRV
  • Pneumococcal
  • Haemophilus
  • Influenza
  • Rotavirus
  • Hepatitis B

Among others, please talk with your child's doctor to learn more about what vaccines they need.

Vaccines for Your Children | CDC
Making the Vaccine Decision: Common Concerns | CDC

Vaccines for Adults

Even though we are vaccinated as children, some of that immunity may wear off over time. Some diseases only present a risk when you are an adult. That is why adults need to keep their vaccinations up to date. Vaccination is the easiest and safest way to prevent illness.

All adults should get the following vaccines:

  • COVID-19 Vaccine
  • Influenza (flu) vaccine every year
  • Td or Tdap vaccine and a booster every 10 years

Factors like age, health conditions, job, lifestyle, or travel habits may mean you need other vaccines. Follow the links below to learn more about what other vaccines might be recommended for you or talk with your healthcare provider about what vaccines are right for you.

Adult Vaccination | CDC

Pregnancy and Vaccination

Here are seven facts you need to know about pregnancy and vaccines.

1. When you get vaccinated during pregnancy, you are not just protecting yourself. Your vaccination gives your baby some early protection!

Your body creates and then passes on protective antibodies (proteins produced by our bodies to fight diseases) from vaccines to your baby. This immunity can protect your baby during their first couple of months of life.

2. Maternal vaccines are very safe for you and your baby.

Any vaccines given during pregnancy are proven to be safe, effective, and necessary for you and your baby's health. 

3. Whooping cough can be a very dangerous illness for your baby.

You will be recommended to get a Tdap vaccine during each pregnancy during the 27th and 36th week. Tdap protects against whooping cough, an illness that can be life-threatening for newborns.

4. The flu can lead to severe pregnancy complications if caught during pregnancy.

The flu increases the risk of pregnancy complications such as preterm labor and preterm birth. The flu shot can be given during any trimester.

5. Timing, timing, timing.

Timing is crucial for vaccines. The CDC recommends getting the flu shot by the end of October to be best protected before any flu activity increases. The Tdap shot protects your baby, which is why the CDC recommends that you get the Tdap vaccine at the 27th and 36th week of pregnancy so you can pass on as many protective antibodies as possible before you give birth.

6. ANYONE around your baby needs to be vaccinated as well.

When your baby is born, their immune system is not fully developed, making them vulnerable to infections. ANYONE (your other children, grandparents, aunties, uncles, etc.) who meets your baby should be up to date on all the routine vaccines, including the Tdap and flu vaccines. Any vaccine updates should be done two weeks before meeting the new baby.

7. If you get pregnant again, you will need the vaccines again.

When you get vaccinated during pregnancy, you are, in part, getting your baby vaccinated. So, for each new pregnancy, you need another round of vaccines. You give protection to your baby during each pregnancy. When you are pregnant, you should get the Tdap vaccine and flu shot (recommended annually).

The links below discuss more in-depth information about vaccination during pregnancy.

Pregnancy and Vaccination | CDC

Traveling and Vaccination

Traveling to different locations will require additional vaccinations because of potential exposure to diseases not native to your region. Before traveling out of the county, visit the link below to learn about travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine preventable illness, and more to plan safe and fun travel.

Destinations | Travelers' Health | CDC

Immunization Schedule

Follow the link below to view the complete Immunization Schedules approved and promoted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Immunization Schedules | CDC


We can help you get vaccinated.  

Emergency Operations Center

Emergency Operations Center

The Emergency Operations Center (EOC), established in 2020, serves as an EOC for 17 tribal nations and one service unit across a four-state region and provides training on disaster mitigation to individuals from these areas. The EOC also develops and implements culturally responsive public health emergency management plans and procedures to support Great Plains Area tribal communities.

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Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center

Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center

The Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center provides support to tribal nations across the Great Plains to help diagnose health disparities and the presence of diseases and disorders in our communities. 

Read more

Oyate Health Center

Oyate Health Center

The Oyate Health Center is a tribally-owned and operated walk-in primary care clinic located in Rapid City, South Dakota. The facility is under the management of the Great Plains Tribal Leaders’ Health Board.

Read more

Last modified on: Thursday, July 21st, 2022 @ 10:37 am

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